To: The Family of Sylvia Muntean (and her sister Helen)
From: Former employee of Sylvia Muntean (Dragos Coal Co.)

I just happen to be fooling around on web search and typed in Dragos Coal and to my surprise I came across a site dedicated to Sylvia Muntean.

To: The Family of Sylvia Muntean (and her sister Helen)
From: Former employee of Sylvia Muntean (Dragos Coal Co.)

I just happen to be fooling around on web search and typed in Dragos Coal and to my surprise I came across a site dedicated to Sylvia Muntean.

I worked at Dragos Coal approximately from 1964-1966 during the summer and wintertime bagging charcoal and as a helper delivering coal to homes and businesses part-time while attending Sharon Jr. and Sr. High School.

I was hired by Sylvia; because my brother had a short excellent work record as a part-time employee, so I rode his coattails. Hopefully, I was as good or better of an employee. (Personally, I think I was better).

At age fifteen, when Sylvia handed me my first official paycheck with my very own name on it, I was so proud. It was my first true indoctrination into manhood and responsibility. I still think about that first paycheck this very day. I have received many more afterward through the years, but that one was special. My family was very poor, that paycheck and the others the job provided were put to good use.

Funny thing about while working for Sylvia and her sister Helen, I felt there had to be a man behind the scene in control of the business. First, I thought it was Helen's husband who came around often (at that time, I believed he was suffering with health problems) was the boss. No, it was definitely, Sylvia. It didn't take long for me to realize that she was the big boss (or as they would say today, the CEO).

Speaking of a macho man's business, coal is it. Sylvia was a tough, stern, fair-mined, honest person to work for. You did it her way or else. Like when I had to wash the office walls starting at the bottom; working my way up the walls. Also, it was obvious that all of the older male workers respected her and did what they were told to do. Or they would catch hell from her, both whites and African-Americans.

At that time, I was being raised by a stern mother, so I didn't have any hang ups about being bossed by a woman. During one summer I did yard work for Sylvia's and Helen's mother, who lived not far from Buhl Farm. From her, I could see where she inherited many of those excellent qualities. Over the years I had forgotten that my first real boss in the work environment was a woman. Seeing the web page dedicated to her, refreshed my memory.

With my hat off and a toast to a lovely, vivacious boss lady and her sister:

Sylvia Muntean and Helen.

Sincerely, an African-American male who has not forgotten his roots,

God Bless,

Phil Adams
Charlotte NC

The original article: Sylvia Muntean: Dedicated to Faith, Knowledge, and Good Works